National Black Chamber of Commerce (NBCC) - Overview

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National Black Chamber of Commerce

The National Black Chamber of Commerce, or NBCC, was established in 1993 to represent and support African American-owned businesses and black entrepreneurs and the communities in which they operate both within the United States and through interchange with the African diaspora. The NBCC works with more than 100,000 African American-owned businesses in the US.

National Black Chamber of Commerce Key Information:

Year Founded

1993

Founders

Harry Alford & Kay DeBow Alford

Headquarters

Washington, DC

Phone

(202) 466-6888

Address

4400 Jenifer St. NW, Suite 331, Washington DC, 20015 US

Email

info@nationalbcc.org

The National Black Chamber of Commerce Can Be Found At:

Recent News About the National Black Chamber of Commerce:

National Black Chamber of Commerce FAQs:

How do I join the National Black Chamber of Commerce?

Simply go to the Membership Benefits page and you can pay the $300.00 NBCC membership fee via PayPal. That page also lists all the benefits of joining the National Black Chamber of Commerce, including access to NBCC publications, an invitation to the NBCC Annual Business Convention, the means to grow your business via trade partners and government contracts, and more.

When is the 2019 National Black Chamber of Commerce Annual Business Conference?

The 2019 NBCC Annual Business Conference, "27 Years Of Diversity & Inclusion: Economic Empowerment Through Entrepreneurial Pursuits," will be held in Atlanta, Georgia from July 24 through July 27.

Does my membership in my local Black Chamber of Commerce mean I'm a member of the NBCC?

No - the National Black Chamber of Commerce provides some technical support to local chapters but does not act as a parent organization. You need to join NBCC separately.

What does the National Black Chamber of Commerce do?

The NBCC works tirelessly to create and maintain the health and growth of African American-owned businesses throughout the United States. They do this by following a strategic plan based on four goals: to increase business and opportunities for black-owned businesses and businesspeople; to provide the means to fund and guide NBCC programs; to educate and train the population as to the multiple benefits of African American-owned business development; and to technically support local chambers.